"Sean Gullette's performance, as the mathematics genius, deserves Oscar consideration." --Michael Blowen, The Boston Globe    "An actor of formidable resources and concentration." --The Los Angeles Times    "Sean Gullette, who also co-wrote the film, plays Max so convincingly that when he begins trembling at another imminent migraine attack, you feel like it's coming your way too." ---- BBC    "Central thesp Gullette pulls off the near-impossible task of sustaining an internalized, ever-cranking-upward tension throughout...recalls the young John Casale..." --Daily Variety    "Gullette holds the screen authoritatively..." --The Chicago Tribune    "An ambitious thrust...staggeringly powerful..." --the Hollywood Reporter    "Sean Gullette is hypnotic..." --Jeff Craig, Sixty Second Preview    "...Gullette is a math whiz who's obsessively hunting for a pattern in the stock market...it's all very intense, and ever more dismaying as it becomes clear that what we are witnessing is less a mathematical breakthrough than a mental breakdown..." --People magazine    "...a visionary recluse, played persuasively by Sean Gullette...when Max shaves his head and marks with dotted lines the exact lobe where the secret burns, and places a power drill to his skull and flips on the switch, it's not to fill his brain but to empty it. This movie is what pours out, like shimmering celluloid, or the burned scar tissue of a malevolent sunlight..." --SPIN       "dead on performance by Sean Gullette..." -- Film Society of Lincoln Center    "Gullette is a combination of John Turturro and Ben Kingsley, and is superb portraying someone dangling above the abyss, one moment controlled, the next, explosive." --- Columbus Film    "Sean Gullette plays Max beautifully, portraying the mathematician on the edge in the eyes rather than the body. Sean has the added advantage of looking perfectly docile in one scene and completely rabid in the next." ---- File    "Sean Gullette, turning in a particularly unpleasant performance as Marion's psychiatrist..."----Stranger Things Magazine    "...the multi-talented Sean Gullette." --Newsweek    "Gullette turns in a performance that is nothing if not electric." --Philadelphia Enquirer    "A long overdue shot of genuine intellectual gravitas...Gullette is perfectly cast..." --Time Out New York    "...sleepless and disheveled, yet feverishly wide-awake, he skulks with demonic purpose...his name is Max Cohen (Sean Gullette)...a cybergeek version of Taxi Driver..." --Entertaiment Weekly    "Sean Gullette (whose contribution to the story shows in his total commitment to the role of Max) is an actor of eerie intensity..." --New York Law Journal    "Gullette makes Max a fascinating character study and carries the film, rather like Geoffrey Rush carried Shine." ---- Urban Cinefile    "Needless to say, both Aronofsky and Gullette - along with sublime cinematographer Matthew Libatique - are people whose careers must be followed closely." --Film Week, UK       "Gullette's Max is a nouveau underdog." --HX magazine    "...Gullette has the petrified intensity of the late John Cazale..." --The Express, London    "Gullette, who acts like he's in an Eisenstein silent movie, is a vastly more convincing maths genius than Matt Damon in Good Will Hunting." --The Guardian, London    "...Gullette's splendidly focused performance..." --Paris Voice    "Unnerving" --Fangoria    "I found the acting exciting and adventurous." - Rod Steiger [on Artifacts]    "...builds with disarmingly offhand humor to a point of savage revelation and then onwards into genuine compassion." - Bret Easton Ellis [on Artifacts]    "Sean Gullette is really funny in 'Happy Accidents'." -- joeythefilmgeek.com    "...in "Requiem for a Dream," Gullette is Arnold, the dirty old shrink, and I must say he played the part well. I was thoroughly disgusted."-- Electronic Whore   








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"Sean Gullette's performance, as the mathematics genius, deserves Oscar consideration." --Michael Blowen, The Boston Globe

"Central thesp Gullette pulls off the near-impossible task of sustaining an internalized, ever-cranking-upward tension throughout...recalls the young John Casale..." --Daily Variety

"An actor of formidable resources and concentration." --The Los Angeles Times

"Gullette holds the screen authoritatively..." --The Chicago Tribune

"Gullette turns in a performance that is nothing if not electric." --Philadelphia Enquirer

"...Gullette is a math whiz who's obsessively hunting for a pattern in the stock market...it's all very intense, and ever more dismaying as it becomes clear that what we are witnessing is less a mathematical breakthrough than a mental breakdown..." --People magazine

"...a visionary recluse, played persuasively by Sean Gullette...when Max shaves his head and marks with dotted lines the exact lobe where the secret burns, and places a power drill to his skull and flips on the switch, it's not to fill his brain but to empty it. This movie is what pours out, like shimmering celluloid, or the burned scar tissue of a malevolent sunlight..." --SPIN

"Sean Gullette, who also co-wrote the film, plays Max so convincingly that when he begins trembling at another imminent migraine attack, you feel like it's coming your way too." ---- BBC

"dead on performance by Sean Gullette..." -- Film Society of Lincoln Center

"Gullette is a combination of John Turturro and Ben Kingsley, and is superb portraying someone dangling above the abyss, one moment controlled, the next, explosive." --- Columbus Film

"Sean Gullette plays Max beautifully, portraying the mathematician on the edge in the eyes rather than the body. Sean has the added advantage of looking perfectly docile in one scene and completely rabid in the next." ---- File

"Sean Gullette, turning in a particularly unpleasant performance as Marion's psychiatrist..."----Stranger Things Magazine

"...the multi-talented Sean Gullette." --Newsweek

"...Feeding is an integral metaphor in Requiem for a Dream. The few scenes in which people actually eat are uniformly off-putting (Sean Gullette as Arnold, Marion's sometime therapist and occasional sex-for-money partner, cannibalistically tearing at his steak especially so) and each of the characters share a need to be filled up, fed and sated..."----Megan Ratner, Sense of Cinema

"A long overdue shot of genuine intellectual gravitas...Gullette is perfectly cast..." --Time Out New York

"An ambitious thrust...staggeringly powerful..." --the Hollywood Reporter

"Gullette's exhausted, possessed eyes expose all the character's vulnerability and nearly involuntary drive. He is at the center of every scene -- in fact he spends most of the film alone in his makeshift laboratory of an apartment, littered with old computer parts knocked together into a jumble of wires, screens and keyboards. Even when other characters are on the screen -- well-meaning neighbors trying to bring him out of his shell, representatives of the sect or the brokers -- our eyes never leave his." -- Rob Blackwelder, Spliced Wire

"Sean Gullette is hypnotic..." --Jeff Craig, Sixty Second Preview

"...sleepless and disheveled, yet feverishly wide-awake, he skulks with demonic purpose...his name is Max Cohen (Sean Gullette)...a cybergeek version of Taxi Driver..." --Entertaiment Weekly

"Sean Gullette (whose contribution to the story shows in his total commitment to the role of Max) is an actor of eerie intensity..." --New York Law Journal

"Gullette makes Max a fascinating character study and carries the film, rather like Geoffrey Rush carried Shine." ---- Urban Cinefile

"Gullette immerses himself in this eccentric role..." --Cover

"The acting here is truly expectional, most notably Sean Gullette as Max Cohen. He is a dynamic force that adds yet another level of intensity to the story. It's obvious he knows this character and has lived inside his skin. For all his ticks and peculiarities...Gullette instills a sense of the "every man" into the role that allows him to guide us through Max's obsessions into the realm of insanity." --World of Fandom

"In one area, Pi knows no peer...this film boasts the best depiction of migraines I've ever seen...after Max's first two attackes I was duly impressed, but by the fifth and sixth I was feeling a bit shaky myself. Sure enough the next day I was felled by my own migraine..." --Salon

"With much of the action focused on Gullette, who offers a marvellously intense performance as a man increasingly caught in his own web of chaos, p is a visceral viewing experience...it's a film that lingers visually in your mind with a nightmarish quality to it. Needless to say, both Aronofsky and Gullette - along with sublime cinematographer Matthew Libatique - are people whose careers must be followed closely." --Film Week, UK

"...because Max is antisocial, cranky, and going steadily crazy, he could easily be offputting, but Sean Gullette doesn't just go for the easy beats. He counterpoints Max's ever present tension with an air of resignation, as though this man has learned from hard experience that no one is ever really going to listen to him.

In the scenes with Mark Margolis' Sol, Gulllette subtly alters his attitude, replacing resignation with the impatience of a small child challenging a beloved parent. He lets Max become loud and urgent because he feels Sol is the only person who has a clue what he's talking about--if he's going to make himself understood by another human being. The character feels it's now or never. Gullette plays the scenes as though Max is almost conscious of the nonverbal demands he's making on Sol, whom Margolis adeptly portrays with a combination of avuncular fondness, caginess and dread of his own.

The two actors establish a rhythm between them that lets us instantly accept them as people who have been arguing and inspiring one another for years. Gullette makes Max brisk and subdued in dealing with all others: he wants to get them out of the way. We know the character is becoming interested in the numerical underpinnings of the Kabballah, a sacred and mystical jewish text, because he finally begins to speak in a normal cadence when discussing it." -- Backstage West

"Gullette's Max is a nouveau underdog." --HX magazine

"...Gullette has the petrified intensity of the late John Cazale..." --The Express, London

"Gullette, who acts like he's in an Eisenstein silent movie, is a vastly more convincing maths genius than Matt Damon in Good Will Hunting." --The Guardian, London

"...Gullette's splendidly focused performance..." --Paris Voice

"Unnerving" --Fangoria

"I found the acting exciting and adventurous." - Rod Steiger [on Artifacts]

"...builds with disarmingly offhand humor to a point of savage revelation and then onwards into genuine compassion." - Bret Easton Ellis [on Artifacts]

"Sean Gullette is really funny in 'Happy Accidents'." -- joeythefilmgeek.com

"...in "Requiem for a Dream," Gullette is Arnold, the dirty old shrink, and I must say he played the part well. I was thoroughly disgusted."-- Electronic Whore